Choosing a Java hosting provider

TL;DR: Go for a VPS. I now use Digitalocean, they’re awesome.

Selecting a web hosting provider is a tough job for any web developer that wants to put a Java/JEE web application online. The choice is much simpler when it comes to publishing a PHP web site and there are a load of cheap (and sometimes quite reliable) PHP hosting providers to choose from with LAMP being the de facto standard in the web hosting world. But when it comes to Java hosting providers the picture becomes blurrier. The common thing that all these environments need is a Java container. The most popular choice is Tomcat but there are providers that use Resin, Weblogic or Websphere (the latter two are full fledged JEE containers).
With the raise of lightweight J2EE servers started by the Spring folks, a little revolution began in the Java world: running enterprise-grade JEE webapps without the need for an EJB container; a servlet container is enough. Tomcat should fill the bill for just about any Java web application that doesn’t use EJBs. The advantage that comes from running a servlet container is the smaller footprint compared with an EJB container. This is critical when it comes to selecting hosting environments since you’re paying for resources (especially RAM) that have to be sized to accommodate the memory requirements of the web application.

Self hosting: Home-based dedicated server (near $0)
homepcYou can use your home internet connection and a PC where the web container runs and deploys your web application. There is an obvious advantage since the server is physically located close to the development team: complete control and physical access to the machine. The other big plus is the price: you’re already paying for the internet connection and chances are you already have a PC that can be transformed into a server. And chances are that you already have a development environment that can be the basis of the production deployment. Here are the shortcomings:- Bandwidth limitations: the webserver where the webapp lives will upload content to the web browsers that access the application. The upload bandwidth is smaller than the download bandwidth and will result in longer load times for web clients.
– Some internet providers cap the internet traffic so you may run beyond the limit.
– You may violate contractual obligations you agreed with your Internet provider by running your own web server.
– The internet connection is not reliable: provider’s downtime directly translates in downtime for your webapp.
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